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Defining the location axis

In the SitePlan Definitions choose 2.10 Time/Location definition menu and click on it.

The start and end location values must be entered in the “Location” column. These set the overall scale of the chart. Intermediate locations can also be entered and these will be shown on the chart.

The start and end location values must be entered in the “Location” column. These set the overall scale of the chart. Intermediate locations can also be entered and these will be shown on the chart.

Sometimes it is more convenient to use codes to represent locations. In this example the East and West portals have codes (EP and WP) against their location chainages. Either the “raw” chainage or the code can be used to reference a location, or a mixture as shown here in the background document.

This technique is useful in hi rise (use T15 instead of level 60.250, say) or in housing programs where unit numbers can be used.

Selecting and positioning activities

To be included on the Time/Location chart, an activity must have an entry in the “Location” column of Time/Location List, view document 2.1. In this example, the railway line extends from chainage 0 to 8000 and the activities have location entries in this range.

The location can also be floors of a building, levels of the floors, number of houses, depth of a mine shaft, etc.

The Time element

The position of a bar on the Time/Location chart is taken from the start and end dates of the activity.

To avoid too much detail on the chart it is often necessary to summarise a series of activities into T types (SitePlan speak for hammocks).

Three kinds of activity bars

Activities can be represented as fixed bars, sloping bars or block bars.

Fixed bars

Are activities located at one, fixed location – for example, “Construct East portal”. They are given a single location value.

Sloping Bars

Are activities that stretch between two points – eg: “Line tunnel”. They require two location values separated by a hyphen (-).

Block Bars

Are activities that stretch between two points, but have no direction or “flow” – eg: “Station buildings”. They require two location values separated by a hash (#). Block bars often represent a larger group of activities summarised as a T type.